Boston and the Civil War.
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Boston and the Civil War. by Walter Muir Whitehill

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Published by Boston Athenaeum in Boston .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Boston (Mass.) -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865.

Book details:

Edition Notes

SeriesRobert Charles Billings Fund publications -- no. 1.
The Physical Object
Pagination17 p.
Number of Pages17
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14313388M

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Interweaving vivid portraits of the Boston community with major political and military events of the Civil War, O’Connor relates how the war forever changed lives, disrupted homes, altered work habits, reshaped political allegiances, and transformed with colorful anecdotes about local figures, both renowned and long-forgotten, this is a fascinating account that will appeal to Civil War buffs, Cited by: 2. Boston's black and white abolitionists forged a second American revolution dedicated to ending slavery and honoring the promise of liberty made in the Declaration of Independence. Before the war, Bostonians were bitterly divided between those who supported the Union and those opposed to its endorsement of slavery. The Fugitive Slave Act brought the horrors of slavery close to home and led many. Boston and the Civil War. Boston, Boston Athenaeum, (OCoLC) Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Walter Muir Whitehill. Find more information about: OCLC Number: Notes: "Delivered as a lecture at the Museum of Fine Arts on 20 February ".   The effects of the Civil War were felt in Boston since the very beginning, starting with abolitionist John Brown’s failed raid on Harper’s Ferry in October of This event, which was Brown’s attempt to cause a slave uprising in the south in order to bring an end to slavery, is considered by many historians to have greatly escalated.

A leader in the Education and Preservation of the American Civil War. The Civil War Round Table of Greater Boston has been working with The Reenacting Community, The Historical Societies of this Commonwealth, and with all Veterans and Military Organizations, in order to promote and preserve our American History. GREATER BOSTON. CIVIL WAR BOSTON As part of the nationwide commemoration marking the sesquicentennial of the Civil War, Boston’s Freedom Trail Foundation is proud to announce the publication of a new guidebook called Walking Tours of Civil War Boston. During the antebellum years, Boston was the hub of the abolitionist movement, and when war came, Bostonians played leading . Filed under: United States -- History -- Civil War, The American War: Its Origin, Cause and Probable Results, Considered Specially With Regard to Slavery (Dunedin, NZ: J. Mackay, ), by Thomas Halliwell (PDF in Australia).   According to the book, The Maritime History of Massachusetts by Samuel Eliot Morrison, the Civil War greatly affected Massachusetts commerce and shipping but Morrison argues that maritime shipping had been slowly dying before the war even began.

  Boston's black and white abolitionists forged a second American revolution dedicated to ending slavery and honoring the promise of liberty made in the Declaration of Independence. Before the war, Bostonians were bitterly divided between those who supported the Union and those opposed to its endorsement of : $ Bookstores specializing in Civil War. Looking for civil war books? hosts over of the finest online book stores and booksellers, including specialists in civil war. Use the list below to locate a specific specialist bookseller or book store near you. The American Civil War () was a civil war in the United States of America. Eleven Southern slave states declared their secession from the United States and formed the Confederate States of America, also known as "the Confederacy". Massachusetts played a major role in the causes of the American Civil War, particularly with regard to the political ramifications of the antislavery abolitionist movement. Antislavery activists in Massachusetts sought to influence public opinion and applied moral and political pressure on the United States Congress to abolish slavery. William Lloyd Garrison (), of Boston began.